Contest Guidelines

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Announcing the 1st annual May Day Mountain Chapbook Series 
The winning author will receive $100 in prize money plus fifty 5×7, handmade letterpress copies of their manuscript, designed and illustrated by May Day Studio of Montpelier, Vermont.
  • $10.00 reading fee
  • Reading period: November 8, 2019 – March 1, 2020.
  • Winner will be announced in the spring of 2020.
  • Send 30-50 pages of fiction, short stories, poetics, nonfiction, hybrid, short scripts, experimental biography and autobiography, as well as new approaches to journalism, scholarship, and critique.
  • If needed, include a table of contents and acknowledgments.
  • Simultaneous submissions are accepted, but please notify us immediately if your work is accepted elsewhere.
  • Every submitter will receive a hardcopy of a classic issue of Hunger Mountain.

The Howard Frank Mosher Short Fiction Prize, The Ruth Stone Poetry Prize, The Katherine Paterson Prize for Young Adult & Children’s Writing, The Hunger Mountain Creative Nonfiction Prize, & The International Young Writers Prize are open for submissions from November 1, 2019, to March 1, 2020.

For the first four categories, one first place winner receives $1,000 & online publication, & one runner-up receives $100 & online publication. You may enter more than one piece in each category, or separate pieces in multiple categories, but each entry needs its own entry fee. Simultaneous submissions are welcome, but please let us know within twenty-four hours if your work is accepted elsewhere, & please know that we can’t refund entry fees. You can read previous winners here.

The Guest Judges will be announced soon. We look forward to reading your best!

The Young Writers Prize is open to all genres of creative writing: fiction, nonfiction, poetry, & writing for children. Our goal is to foster the next generation of creative writers, & to encourage young people to make their voices heard.One winner will receive a $100 honorarium & online publication. Read the inaugural winner here. This contest is judged by Hunger Mountain’s Assistant Editors.

We recommend you read previous issues and our Mission Statement to get an idea of who we are and what excites us.

Issue #24Patterns is closed for submissions, & will be published in March, 2020.

Please submit to our Contests here.

Issue #24’s theme: Patterns can be worn or flown. Bees dance them. Humans walk them daily. Patterns can be mundane or systemic. Tibetan monks make mandalas then blow them away. Ancient cultures left their trace in how they arranged stone. Drums, contrapuntal rhythm, jazz, orchestras, electronica. Knitters and tailors make them, societies break them. Climate is the pattern of the weather, personality is a pattern of behavior. Migration and immigration are both patterns. Diné weavers include deliberate imperfections in their weft and warp; Aran islands’ families’ sweater patterns are used to identify drowned fishermen; chaos follows a pattern, just one our science isn’t precise enough to predict. Herringbone, honeycomb, paisley, polka dot, tartan, chevron, ikat, meander, grid, akwete, adire, damask, chintz, madras, gingham, houndstooth.

We’ll publish art to help us see when our individual and collective patterns aren’t serving us well anymore, how to resist, how to envision new conventions, work with both ornament and design, & all kinds of writing that cracks expectations. In this election year, what patterns will we set, and what will we disrupt?

General Submission Guidelines

Issue #24Patterns is closed for submissions, & will be published in March, 2020.

Please submit to our Contests here.

Issue #24’s theme: Patterns can be worn or flown. Bees dance them. Humans walk them daily. Patterns can be mundane or systemic. Tibetan monks make mandalas then blow them away. Ancient cultures left their trace in how they arranged stone. Drums, contrapuntal rhythm, jazz, orchestras, electronica. Knitters and tailors make them, societies break them. Climate is the pattern of the weather, personality is a pattern of behavior. Migration and immigration are both patterns. Diné weavers include deliberate imperfections in their weft and warp; Aran islands’ families’ sweater patterns are used to identify drowned fishermen; chaos follows a pattern, just one our science isn’t precise enough to predict. Herringbone, honeycomb, paisley, polka dot, tartan, chevron, ikat, meander, grid, akwete, adire, damask, chintz, madras, gingham, houndstooth.

We’ll publish art to help us see when our individual and collective patterns aren’t serving us well anymore, how to resist, how to envision new conventions, work with both ornament and design, & all kinds of writing that cracks expectations. In this election year, what patterns will we set, and what will we disrupt?